Group Project
Applied Psychology / Year 3

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Jamie O'Reilly

Jamie O'Reilly

Applied Psychology

Year 3

Lucy Lovatt

Lucy Lovatt

Applied Psychology

Year 3

Sarah Harcourt

Sarah Harcourt

Applied Psychology

Year 3

  • Project Title Same Difference Mental Health App
  • Course BSc [Hons] Applied Psychology
  • Year 3
  • Contact Info N00150095@student.iadt.ie
    N00111323@student.iadt.ie
    N00113464@student.iadt.ie

Same Difference

The aim of this app is to educate children on developmental disorders that are specific to children of their age. This app will give children scientific/accurate information on five different disorders, ADHD, Autism, Depression, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia. The app will educate the children using child friendly terms as to not overwhelm them with terminology that is too difficult for them to process at this young age. With the use of this app it is hoped that this will bring children together and to encourage an inclusive acceptance within the classroom.

Project Description

Same difference is a mental health app designed for children between the ages of 9-11 in 4th class of primary school. Through background research we discovered that there were a lack of scientifically supported mental health apps for children and a need for an improvement of the educational school based programs that were implemented to promote well-being and disorders specific to leaning, behavioral and emotional issues. Similar apps that offer interactive approaches to helping with mental health were found however, they did not provide valid information for specific disorders. Same Difference offers an interactive and educational tool, which is supported by scientific facts. In order to provide the user with an interactive experience, information on each disorder was structured in a Frequently Asked Question format which was related to a comic style storyboard depicting a common scenario of each disorder within a classroom setting. Ethical approval was given by the DTPEC (Department of Technology and Psychology Ethics Committee), In addition to getting ethical approval, Consent forms were given to the participants of our usability testing. Characters in the storyboards were hand drawn and transposed to Photoshop, then edited and the final product was created using Invision.com. During the creation of the app, usability testing was done, changes to the design and information were made.

Project Findings

Grist, Porter and Stallard (2017), reviewed 24 different apps for mental health. They were rated on efficacy helping with several disorders, app usage and app acceptability with the perspectives from therapists. Results show that there were no reductions in depression, anxiety or stress when the apps were used. Participants stated that the apps needed to be more interactive, attractive and needed to clearly provide important information on the disorders. Although the design and interactive features of a mental health app are important, many studies reveal errors in these apps due to their lack of clinical scientific effectiveness. Reynolds (2017) discusses how some apps promise success and solutions to stress or specific disorders within a few minutes or logins with their app. If an app has connections to a clinical professional, then it probably contains scientifically based facts. However, most apps do not include such features and focus on a quick fix of relaxation.

Group Project
Applied Psychology / Year 3